Grand Western Canal

The Grand Western Canal is a narrow canal and is part of the Waterways of Mainland Britain. It runs for 10 miles and 6½ furlongs from Lowdwells (which is a dead end) to Tiverton (which is a dead end).

The maximum dimensions for a boat to be able to travel on the waterway are 72 feet long and 7 feet wide. The maximum headroom is not known. The maximum draught is not known.

Notable features of the waterway include: Waytown Tunnel

Relevant publications — Waterway Guides:

 
 
 

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Lowdwells
End of Navigation
Waytown Tunnel (East End) 2¾ furlongs 0 locks
Waytown Tunnel (West End) 3 furlongs 0 locks
Waytown Limekilns 3½ furlongs 0 locks
Whipcott Wharf Bridge 5¾ furlongs 0 locks
Fenacre Bridge 1 mile and 1¼ furlongs 0 locks
Fossend Bridge 1 mile and 4½ furlongs 0 locks
Black Bridge at Westleigh 1 mile and 5¼ furlongs 0 locks
Ebear Bridge 2 miles and 3½ furlongs 0 locks
Westcott Bridge 2 miles and 6¾ furlongs 0 locks
Ayshford Bridge 3 miles and 4 furlongs 0 locks
Holbrooke Bridge 3 miles and 6¾ furlongs 0 locks
Boehill Bridge 4 miles and ¾ furlongs 0 locks
Buckland Bridge 4 miles and 3 furlongs 0 locks
Sampford Peverell 4 miles and 4¼ furlongs 0 locks
Sampford Peverell Winding Hole 4 miles and 4¾ furlongs 0 locks
Sampford Peverell Bridge
With attached footbridge
4 miles and 6 furlongs 0 locks
Batten Bridge
Road leading to Battens Farm from the Grand Western Canal Vistor Guide
5 miles and 2½ furlongs 0 locks
Watton Bridge 5 miles and 6¾ furlongs 0 locks
Rock House Bridge 5 miles and 7½ furlongs 0 locks
High Street Bridge
Former Swing Bridge
6 miles and 2 furlongs 0 locks
Greenway Bridge (Halberton) 6 miles and 3¾ furlongs 0 locks
Sellake Bridge 6 miles and 7 furlongs 0 locks
Dudley Weatherley Jubilee Bridge 7 miles and 7¼ furlongs 0 locks
Tiverton Road Bridge
Road between Tiverton and Halberton
7 miles and 7¾ furlongs 0 locks
Crownhill Bridge 8 miles and 1½ furlongs 0 locks
Railway Narrows (Halberton) 8 miles and 4¼ furlongs 0 locks
Warnicombe Bridge 8 miles and 6¼ furlongs 0 locks
Manley Bridge 9 miles and 1½ furlongs 0 locks
East Manley Bridge 9 miles and 4¼ furlongs 0 locks
Tidcombe Bridge
Near Newtes Hill
10 miles and ¾ furlongs 0 locks
William Authers Footbridge 10 miles and 2¾ furlongs 0 locks
Bampfylde Close Winding Hole 10 miles and 4 furlongs 0 locks
Tiverton Aqueduct
Trains use to go under the aqueduct
10 miles and 4½ furlongs 0 locks
Tiverton Winding Hole 10 miles and 5¼ furlongs 0 locks
Tiverton
End of Navigation
10 miles and 6½ furlongs 0 locks
 
 
 
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Wikipedia has a page about Grand Western Canal

The Grand Western Canal ran between Taunton in Somerset and Tiverton in Devon in the United Kingdom. The canal had its origins in various plans, going back to 1796, to link the Bristol Channel and the English Channel by a canal, bypassing Lands End. An additional purpose of the canal was the supply of limestone and coal to lime kilns along with the removal of the resulting quicklime, which was used as a fertiliser and for building houses. This intended canal-link was never completed as planned, as the coming of the railways removed the need for its existence.

Construction was in two phases. A level section from Tiverton to Lowdwells on the Devon/Somerset border, opened in 1814, and was capable of carrying broad-beam barges, carrying up to 40 tons. The Somerset section, suitable for tub-boats, which were about 20 feet (6.1 m) long and capable of carrying eight tons, opened in 1839. It included an inclined plane and seven boat lifts, the earliest lifts to see commercial service in the UK. The lifts predated the Anderton Boat Lift by nearly 40 years.

The 11 miles of Devon section remains open, despite various threats to its future, and is now a designated country park and local nature reserve, and allows navigation. The Somerset section was closed in 1867, and is gradually disappearing from the landscape, although sections are now used as a footpath. It maintains a historical interest and has been subject to some archaeological excavations.

Other Wikipedia pages that might relate to Grand Western Canal
[Mid Devon] [Sampford Peverell] [Halberton] [Holcombe Rogus] [Nynehead] [Ashbrittle] [James Green (engineer)] [Ayshford] [Oake]
Information retrieved Thursday 31 December 2015 at 11:03