River Foss

The River Foss is a small river and is part of the Waterways of Mainland Britain. It runs for 1 mile and 2½ furlongs through 1 lock from Monk Bridge (which is a dead end) to Ouse - Foss Junction (where it joins the River Ouse : Yorkshire (non-tidal section)).

The maximum dimensions for a boat to be able to travel on the waterway are 82 feet long and 18 feet and 6 inches wide. The maximum headroom is not known. The maximum draught is not known.

Relevant publications — Waterway Maps:

 
 
 

A map will be shown here if you are logged on

Monk Bridge
Upper limit of navigation.
Foss Bank Pipe Bridge ¼ furlongs 0 locks
Foss Bank Bridge 2¼ furlongs 0 locks
Layerthorpe Bridge
The bridge is 38yds (35m) long.
2½ furlongs 0 locks
DEFRA Pedestrian Bridge
Closed
3¼ furlongs 0 locks
Wormald's Cut 4 furlongs 0 locks
Palmer Street Footbridge 4½ furlongs 0 locks
Rowntree Wharf Pedestrian Bridge 5¼ furlongs 0 locks
Rowntree Wharf Arm 5½ furlongs 0 locks
Foss Bridge 6¼ furlongs 0 locks
Piccadilly Bridge, York 6½ furlongs 0 locks
Castle Mills Bridge 1 mile and ¼ furlongs 0 locks
Castle Mills Lock Weir Entrance
Channel leading to the Weir - No Access
1 mile and ¼ furlongs 0 locks
Castle Mills Lock 1 mile and ½ furlongs 0 locks
Castle Mills Lock Basin
Basin and weir exit
1 mile and ¾ furlongs 1 lock
Foss Barrier
Flood water defence
1 mile and 1½ furlongs 1 lock
Blue Bridge 1 mile and 2 furlongs 1 lock
Ouse - Foss Junction
Junction of Rivers Ouse and Foss
1 mile and 2½ furlongs 1 lock
 
 
 
There are no links to external websites from here.
Why not log in and add some (go to "Edit and Change" on the menu and select "Edit websites")?
 
 
 
 

Wikipedia has a page about River Foss

The River Foss is an improved river in North Yorkshire, England, and a tributary of the River Ouse. It rises in the Foss Crooks woods near Oulston reservoir close to the village of Yearsley and runs south through the Vale of York to the Ouse. The name most likely comes from the Latin word Fossa, meaning ditch and is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The York district was settled by Norwegian and Danish people, so parts of the place names could be old Norse. Referring to the etymological dictionary "Etymologisk ordbog", ISBN 82-905-2016-6 dealing with the common Danish and Norwegian languages - roots of words and the original meaning. The old Norse word Fos (waterfall) meaning impetuous. The River Foss was dammed, and even though the elevation to the river Ouse is small, a waterfall was formed. This may have lead to the name Fos, and later changed to Foss.

The responsibility for the management of the river's drainage area lies with the Foss Internal drainage board (IDB). It has responsibility for the area from Crayke to the pre-1991 city boundary of York covering 9,085 hectares and 162.54 km of waterways. The Foss IDB is itself part of the York Consortium of Drainage Boards that oversees 10 IDB's in the Yorkshire region.

The typical river level range at the Foss Barrier is between 5.05m and 7.90m. The highest river level recorded at this location was 10.20 metres and the river level reached 9.34 metres on 23 January 2008.

Other Wikipedia pages that might relate to River Foss
[Haxby] [Foss, Oregon] [Bustardthorpe] [Foss Islands Branch Line] [St John's in the Marsh Church, York] [New Earswick] [Huntington, City of York] [Strensall] [Yearsley]
Information retrieved Tuesday 29 December 2015 at 11:31