Huddersfield Broad Canal

The Huddersfield Broad Canal is a broad canal and is part of the Waterways of Mainland Britain. It runs for 3 miles and 4 furlongs through 9 locks from Cooper Bridge Junction (where it joins the Calder and Hebble Navigation (Main Line)) to Aspley Basin (Huddersfield) (where it joins the Huddersfield Narrow Canal).

The maximum dimensions for a boat to be able to travel on the waterway are 57 feet and 6 inches long and 14 feet wide. The maximum headroom is 9 feet and 2 inches. The maximum draught is 5 feet and 7 inches.

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Cooper Bridge Junction
Junction of the Huddersfield Broad Canal and the Calder and Hebble Navigation
Leeds Road Bridge ¾ furlongs 0 locks
River Colne Junction
No access to the downstream river which is cordoned off with red buoys.
1 furlong 0 locks
Cooper Bridge No 1 1 furlong 0 locks
Cooper Bridge Lock No 1 1 furlong 0 locks
Cooper Bridge Railway Bridge No 2 2¼ furlongs 1 lock
Colne Bridge Lock No 2 2½ furlongs 1 lock
Colne Bridge No 3 3 furlongs 2 locks
Colne Bridge First Pipe Bridge 3½ furlongs 2 locks
Colne Bridge Second Pipe Bridge 4¾ furlongs 2 locks
Colne Bridge Third Pipe Bridge 5¼ furlongs 2 locks
Colne Bridge Railway Bridge No 4
Carries a cycle path over the canal
5½ furlongs 2 locks
Joe Kayes Bridge No 5 6¼ furlongs 2 locks
Ladgrave Lock No 3 6¼ furlongs 2 locks
Longlands Lock No 4 1 mile and ¼ furlongs 3 locks
Vernon Bridge No 6 1 mile and ¾ furlongs 4 locks
Deighton Viaduct No 7 (disused) 1 mile and 1 furlong 4 locks
Deighton Road Bridge No 8 1 mile and 1¾ furlongs 4 locks
Turnpike Road Lock No 5 1 mile and 3¾ furlongs 4 locks
Annis Lee Bridge No 9 1 mile and 4¾ furlongs 5 locks
Reading Lock No 6 1 mile and 4¾ furlongs 5 locks
Fieldhouse Bridge No 10 1 mile and 6 furlongs 6 locks
Fieldhouse Green Lock No 7 1 mile and 6¼ furlongs 6 locks
Falls Lock No 8 1 mile and 7 furlongs 7 locks
Red Doles Bridge No 11 2 miles and ¾ furlongs 8 locks
Red Doles Lock No 9
Also called Fartown Green Lock
2 miles and ¾ furlongs 8 locks
New Road Bridge No 11A 2 miles and 3½ furlongs 9 locks
Hillhouse Lane Bridge No 12 2 miles and 4¾ furlongs 9 locks
Leeds Road Bridge No 13 2 miles and 5¾ furlongs 9 locks
Gas Street Bridge No 14 2 miles and 6¼ furlongs 9 locks
Huddersfield First Gas Pipe Bridge 2 miles and 6¼ furlongs 9 locks
Huddersfield Second Gas Pipe Bridge 2 miles and 6¼ furlongs 9 locks
Anchor Street Winding Hole 2 miles and 7 furlongs 9 locks
Turnbridge Footbridge 3 miles 9 locks
Turnbridge Lifting Bridge 3 miles 9 locks
Aspley Basin Bridge No 18 3 miles and 3¾ furlongs 9 locks
Aspley Basin (Huddersfield)
Moorings for Huddersfield and Junction of Huddersfield Broad and Narrow Canals
3 miles and 4 furlongs 9 locks
 
 
 
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Wikipedia has a page about Huddersfield Broad Canal

The Huddersfield Broad Canal or Sir John Ramsden's Canal, is a wide-locked navigable canal in West Yorkshire in northern England. The waterway is 3.75 miles (6 km) long and has 9 wide locks. It follows the valley of the River Colne and connects the Calder and Hebble Navigation at Cooper Bridge junction with the Huddersfield Narrow Canal near Aspley Basin in Huddersfield.

Construction was authorised in 1774, and the canal opened two years later. It became part of a trans-Pennine route in 1811 when the Huddersfield Narrow Canal joined it at Aspley Basin. Traffic was hampered by the long narrowboats used on the narrow canal that could not use Ramsden's Canal's shorter locks. Goods were transhipped at Aspley Basin, and although shorter narrowboats were built, its success as a trans-Pennine route was overshadowed by the Rochdale Canal which had wide locks throughout and joined the Calder and Hebble Navigation at Sowerby Bridge. The canal passed into railway ownership in 1845, but prospered into the 20th century. Railway ownership ceased in 1945, when it was bought by the Calder and Hebble Navigation, at which point the narrow canal across the Pennines was abandoned. The broad canal carried commercial traffic, particularly coal for power stations, until 1953.

After the formation of British Waterways in 1962, the canal was designated a cruiseway in 1968, which meant that it was mainly for leisure traffic. Use of the canal has increased significantly since the Hudderfield Narrow Canal re-opened in 2001, as it is no longer a dead end. Many of its structures have been given listed building status, in recognition of their historic importance.

Other Wikipedia pages that might relate to Huddersfield Broad Canal
[Turnbridge] [Turnbridge Lift Bridge] [Canal ring] [Huddersfield Narrow Canal] [South Pennine Ring] [Aspley, West Yorkshire] [Outer Pennine Ring] [Windlass] [West Yorkshire]
Information retrieved Tuesday 29 December 2015 at 12:56